Technical Naming Conventions

Challenge – outside of the ISV development model there is no concept of an application namespace that can be used to group the technical components related to a single logical application. To mitigate this issue, and to provide a means to isolate application-specific components, naming schemes such as application specific prefixes are commonplace.

Risk – without application/module/function namespaces etc. all technical components reside as an unstructured (unpackaged) collection, identified only by their metadata type and name. As such maintainability and future extensibility can be inhibited as the technical components related to multiple logical applications converge into a single unstructured code-base.

Options –
1. Application specific prefix. All components related to a specific application are prefixed with an abbreviated application identifier, e.g. Finance Management = “fm”, HR = “hr”. This option addresses the requirement for isolation, but inevitably causes issue where helper classes or classes related to common objects span multiple applications. This option has the advantage of minimising the effort required to remove functionality related to a logical application, only shared classes would need to be modified.

2. Object centric approach. In considering a Salesforce org as a single consolidated codebase where most components (technical or declarative) relate to a primary data object, a strict object-centric approach can be taken to the naming of technical components. With such a mindset, the concept of a logical application becomes less significant, instead components are grouped against the primary data object and shared across the custom functionality that may be related to the object. A strictly governed construction pattern should promote this concept with the main class types defined on a per-object basis. Functional logic not related to a single object should only every reside in a controller class, web service class or helper class. In the controller and web service cases, the class should orchestrate data transactions across multiple objects to support specific functionality. In the helper class case a function-centric approach is appropriate.

In architectural terms, an object-centric data layer is introduced that is called from a function-centric presentation layer.

presentation layer [Object][Function].page —
SalesInvoiceDiscountCalc.page
SalesInvoiceDiscountCalcController.cls

data layer [Object][Class Type].cls —
SalesInvoiceManager.cls
AccountManager.cls

business logic layer [Function][Helper|Utility]–
DiscountCalcHelper.cls

The downside of this approach is contention on central classes in the data layer when multiple developers are working in a single org, plus the effort required to remove functionality on a selective basis. In the latter case using a source code management system such as Git with a smart tagging strategy can help to mitigate the issue. Additionally, code commenting should always be used to indicate class dependencies (i.e. in the header comment) and to convey the context in which code runs, this is imperative in ensuring future maintainability.

Recommended Approach –
1. Option 2. In summary, naming conventions should not artificially enforce the concept of a logical application – the composition of which is open to change by Admins, instead an object-centric approach should be applied that promotes code re-use and discipline in respect adherence to the applied construction patterns.

Whichever approach is taken, it is highly useful to consider how the consolidated codebase will evolve as future functionality and related code is introduced. A patterns-based approach can mitigate the risk of decreasing maintainability as the codebase size increases.

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