Salesforce Implementation Audit

This post provides an outline approach to consider when performing an internal audit of an existing (or emerging) Salesforce implementation. As an individual who specialises in the provision of such quality assurance services from an external perspective, I’m convinced that most projects would benefit from a periodic internal review, perhaps augmented by some occasional external perspective and insight (Salesforce services can help here). However this is approached, in the majority case the internal project team will have the requisite experience and competency to deliver such an introspective review, the challenge is often one of finding the right time, or indeed any time, to conduct it. This is why a retrospective build review should be planned every 3 or 4 sprints (or thereabouts – projects differ) with a full implementation audit scheduled every release. The principal being that whilst the build is in flight, periodic sense checks are made on key quality aspects, technical integrity, platform limits etc. with a comprehensive audit applied pre-release (ideally). The latter may need to consider a combined future deployment state where multiple parallel development streams converge into a single production org.

Note, an implementation audit is build-focused (or solution oriented) and should not assess the fit-for-purpose nature of the functionality in respect to business requirements (i.e. the problem-to-solution mapping). The only exception to this arises where an obvious mapping to a standard feature is missed resulting in a “gap” that is unnecessarily filled by a technical solution option.

Note, in order to cut down on the time required to conduct the audit access to individuals who can describe the functional intent is imperative. In the internal case the programme/project architect should be leading the audit and should be aware of the functional design context.

Note, before diving into the detail of the implementation, it can be highly valuable to re-define the high-level solution architecture (HLSA) in current state terms. The key point being that the macro-level view is often distorted by micro-level design decisions made during the project course. A periodic check is useful to ensure that this organic change is understood and that the integrity of the original architectural vision is maintained.

Indicative review areas are listed below (this is not exhaustive)

Declarative build environment
1. Identify platform limits that are reaching a high percentage of utilisation that may present risk to scalability and future phases of development.
2. Identify any future maintainability risk presented by the conventions applied in the definition of configuration elements (e.g. naming conventions, opportunities for best practice improvements.).
3. Identify functional areas where a mapping to standard features could be achieved.
4. Identify security vulnerabilities (org-access, sharing model etc.).

Technical customisations
1. Identify risks to data integrity and application responsiveness.
2. Document risks to scalability and extensibility imposed by platform execution limits.
3. Document deviations from best practice technical patterns, conventions and coding standards.
4. Identify security vulnerabilities introduced by technical componentry.
5. Document deviations from best practice development practices and process.

Integration architecture
1. Identify risk associated with deviations from best practice integration patterns and practices.
2. Identify opportunities to reduce limits consumption.
3. Identify data integrity and scalability vulnerabilities related to the current state integration architecture.

Identity management
1. Identify risk associated with implemented single sign-on processes and related services/infrastructure.
2. Document deviations from best practices related to identity management.

Comments

  1. Reblogged this on SutoCom Solutions.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: