Salesforce Exception Reports

I think it’s fair to say that consideration of reporting and analytics is not traditionally a technical architect’s direct concern. In the Salesforce context I always challenge this presumption and promote the idea that a project architect should absolutely be looking at the high-level analytical requirements during the foundation stage of the project. Why you may well ask? The answer to this is simple, in order to design a fit-for-purpose data model you must consider data coming out (via the native reporting tools) as well as data going in efficiently. I make this point in a prior post that outlines my view on the Salesforce development process. The number of projects I see where this thinking hasn’t been applied and 3rd party tools are wheeled in to address the gap continues to surprise me. Key to success here is understanding what can be achieved with the Salesforce reporting functionality. Which brings me on to the topic for this post – exception reports, a type of reporting not obviously catered for by the standard reporting tools. For instance – show me a list of Accounts without an Opportunity in the last year. Such reports are invaluable in identifying omissions, focusing sales activities, generating call lists, tracking inactivity etc. etc.

I’ll use 2 examples below to clarify how to approach such a scenario.

Simple Example.
Accounts without a closed Opportunity in the last 30 days.

For this report we use a “without” Cross Filter as per the screenshots. Cross Filters were added in Spring ’12 and enable records to be filtered based on the existence (or non-existence) of related records which meet defined criteria. Within a Cross filter up to 5 sub-filters can be defined. Note, the report’s top level filters do not apply at the sub-filter level. Cross filters can be added for any related object, custom or standard – the limit is 3 per report (each with up to 5 sub-filters). Powerful functionality indeed and a great convenience that avoids a Custom Report Type for the outer join, note the sub-filter is limited to fields on the related object, no-cross object sub-filter logic is possible.

simple exception report

Complex Example.
Accounts without a Won Opportunity involving a certain Product Family in the last 60 days.

For this report we start with a Cross Filter report to satisfy the “without Won Opportunity” requirement. From there we need a indicator (of the existence of an Opportunity Product linked to a product of the specified family) at the Opportunity level which can be used in a sub-filter. This is actually straightforward to do and relies on the old school technique for exception reports, namely the use of a rollup summary fields and simple workflow.

Solution components :
Opportunity Product – Custom Field – ProductFamilyHardwareFlag
Number (18,0 default 0)

Opportunity Product – Workflow Rule – “Opp Product – New or Changed Product”
Evaluate – Created and Edited – Formula (OR(ISNEW(), ISCHANGED( Product2Id )))

Opportunity Product – Workflow Action – “Opp Product – Set ProdFamilyHardwareFlag”
Field to update [ProductFamilyHardwareFlag] with Formula = IF( TEXT(Product2.Family)=’Hardware’, 1,0)

Opportunity – Custom Field – ProductFamilyHardwareCount
Rollup Summary Field (Opportunity Product – SUM – Field to aggregate = ProductFamilyHardwareFlag). All records included.

How does this all work? In short, a workflow rule on Opportunity Product sets a numeric field equal to 1/0 based on the product family meeting the defined criteria. The numeric field is then rolled up to the Opportunity level via RSF, which is then applied in a sub-filter as below.

complex exception report

Note, this is just an example to illustrate the concept. An actual implementation would typically require a more generic approach.

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